TradeWeb c++IV

100% QnA interview. No coding no white-board no ECT no BP no algo no data structure.

System is Multi-threaded VC++/MSSQL.

One technical interviewer only. (The other 2 are behavior interviewers.) He is a director and looks very technical. I have met perhaps 3 to 5 interviewers focused on the fundamentals of a language/compiler. They pick one of 10 important parts of a language (like java, c++ or c#) and try to determine how well a candidate understands the key details and the rationales.

Below, Q’s are questions from this interviewer. A’s are my answers/guesses.

Q1: let’s talk about non-virtual dtor. You said there are problems in deleting a subclass instance via a base class pointer. Show an example.
A: Eg: subclass holds some resources to be released in its dtor, but in our scenario only the base dtor is called. Subclass dtor is not invoked.

Q1b: if subclass dtor is invoked, does it always run the base dtor?
%%A: Yes guaranteed. See my blog.

Q1c: if a subclass dtor is virtual and you delete an instance via a subclass ptr, you said this is good and subclass dtor will run, so is the “virtual” unnecessary? What’s the difference virtual dtor  vs non-virtual dtor?
A: The dtor is still picked at run time (and slower), but yes in both cases the subclass dtor runs.  If your system is written such that you delete a subclass instance only via a subclass ptr and never superclass ptr, then drop the “virtual” to improve runtime performance.

Q3: Let’s talk about a static member function sf2() in class Base. If you have a reference to a Base instance, Can you call myInstance.sf2()?
A: yes

Q3b: if Base and Der both have a static method sf2()?
A: subclass sf2 tends to hide Base sf2. Static type of myInstance variable is used to determine which version is used.

Q3c: how about myPtr->sf2()? Obscure details that I don’t want to spend too much time on.
%%A: looks very odd, but if it compiles, then it’s static, never dynamic, binding.

Q4: when must you use the pointer “this”? Obscure details that I don’t want to spend too much time on.
%%A: ctor chaining? Actually chaining is supported in c++11 but not using “this”.
A: if there’s a field and a local variable of the same name, I use “this->” to disambiguate. CORRECT:) See
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/22832001/access-member-field-with-same-name-as-local-variable-or-argument
A: in my ctor (or method), i may want to print my address. Yes you can usually do that in the caller afterwards but not always
A (hindsight): Similarly, in my ctor (or method) I may want to conditionally save my address in some container. The conditional logic is not doable after the ctor.
A (hindsight): if I know the host object is in an array, I could do array arithmetic using “this” with precaution.
A: delete this. I have seen people doing it.
A (hindsight): CRTP
A (hindsight): if parent class has a const method m1() and non-const overload m1(), you can cast “this” to call either of them.
A (hindsight): what if inside a method you need to access a parent object field hidden by a host object field? Can you cast “this”? Yes tested but not a “must” use case. Alternative solution is B::nonStaticField
AA: sometimes you must return *this where the return type is HostClass&

Q4b: can you think of an example of using “this” to avoid access violation?

Q4h: why use ctor chaining even if it’s supported? Why not call a common (non-static) setter method s2() from multiple ctors of the same class?
A: that setter has to be non-static!

Q4i: You think ctor should not call a non-static method?
%%A: it can, but I don’t do it. The host object is half-initialized, so the setter method must strictly perform field initialization and nothing else.

Q5: why do people use class templates? Note — Interviewer didn’t ask function templates.
%%A: avoid the cost of virtual functions

Q5b: Let’s look at combining class hierarchy with templates.
A: not a good idea to combine them. STL has probably no virtual functions.

Q5c: Let’s see. You said you have a bunch of “payload” classes PL1/PL2/… and you want to use a container of PL1 and container of PL2. Ok You said that’s a common use case of class templates unrelated to virtual functions. Suppose the container template requires each payload class to implement a method f2(). If f2 is provided by a base class, wouldn’t it be easier (can be virtual or non-virtual)?
A: If there’s a family of payload classes, like Shape, Rectangle, Square… then I feel it’s best practice to use a container of smart pointers. I think it reduces the risk of slicing, among other benefits.
A: if the payload classes don’t form a family hierarchy, then there is probably some template meta-programming technique to provide a default implementation of f2(). I’m no expert on template meta-programming.

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non-virtual dtor: some random scenarios tested #IV

Background — How important are these scenarios? First off, tech quizzes are extremely important since you are judged just over a few questions. Second, these scenarios pop up by accidents, rather than be design, all the time in real projects. You better learn to deal with a drunken driver while on the road.

Q1: what if Base and Derived dtor both non-virtual and an autoVar is destroyed?
AA: Tested — ~Derived() and then ~Base().  See post on DCBC.

Q2: What if Base dtor is non-virtual but Derived is virtual, and a Derived auto variable is destroyed on the stack?
AA: Same as Q1. For an autoVariable that’s not deleted via a ptr, Derived ctor (virtual or not) runs, followed by Base dtor. Same DCBC

Q3: Base dtor is non-virtual but Derived is virtual. Derived heap pointer is assigned to a B pointer and deleted?
AA: only ~Base runs , in my g++ test, though officially UB.

Q4: Base and Derived are virtual. Derived heap pointer is assigned to a B pointer and deleted?
AA: ~Derived() then ~Base(). DCBC + dynamic dispatch

Note the well-known __undefinedBehavior__ affects delete only, not stack variables or static variables.Note virtual keyword affects pointer variable. Non-ref variables aren’t affected.

The object to destruct is a Derived
~B ~D st? delete heap D via B* or D* test result notes
1 nv nv stack ~D~B DCBC + static dispatch
2 nv virtual stack ~D~B DCBC + static dispatch
3 nv virtual B*  ~B only static dispatch. “virtual” ignored
4 v virtual D*  ~D~B DCBC + dynamic dispatch
5 v implicitly v D*  ditto ditto
struct B{
  ~B(){ cout<<"~B\n";}
};
struct D: public B{
  virtual ~D(){ cout<<"~D\n";}
};
int main(){
  B* myD=new D();
  delete myD;
}

PURE-interface types ] c++^java

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/318064/how-do-you-declare-an-interface-in-c
Someone pointed out

“The whole reason you have a special Interface type-category in addition to abstract base classes in C#/Java is because C#/Java do not support multiple inheritance. C++ supports multiple inheritance, and so a special type isn’t needed. An abstract base class with only pure virtual methods is functionally equivalent to a C#/Java interface.”…. actually with minor differences.

The sample code shows no special ctor, though the dtor is public virtual but without “=0” (not pure virtual), so I assume an “interface” type in c++ should have a virtual dtor, since it is designed to be subclassed.

Google style guide is more strict — A class is a pure interface if it meets the following requirements:

  • It has only public pure virtual methods, non-pure virtual destructor, and static methods
    • I feel the dtor should be empty since there’s no instance field.
  • It may not have non-static data members — same as java8 interfaces
  • It need not have any constructors defined. If a constructor is provided, it must take no arguments and it must be protected.

undefined behavior C++: #1 famous, unknown secrets

(See below for smart ptr, template, non-RTTI)

Deleting [1] a derived[3] object via a base[4] pointer is undefined behavior if base[6] class has non-virtual dtor, with or without vtable.

This is well-known but it applies to a very specific situation. Many similar situations aren’t described by this rule —
[1a] This rule requires pointer delete. In contrast, automatic destruction of a non-ref “auto” variable (on stack) is unrelated.

[1b] This rule requires a heap object. Deleting a pointee on stack is a bug but it’s outside this rule.

[1c] This rule is about delete-expression, not delete[]

[3] if the object’s run-time type is base, then this rule is Inapplicable

[4] if the pointer is declared as pointer-to-derived, then Inapplicable, as there is no ambiguity which dtor to run

[3,4] if the object run time type is base, AND pointer is declared pointer-to-derived? Inapplicable — compiler or runtime would have failed much earlier before reaching this point.

[6] what if derived class has non-virtual dtor? Well, that implies base non-virtual too. So Yes applicable.

*) P62 [[effC++]] points out that even in the absence of virtual functions (i.e. in a world of non-RTTI objects), you can still hit this UB by deleting a subclass instance via a base pointer.

**) The same example also shows a derived class-template is considered just like a derived class. Let me spell out the entire rule — deleting an instance of a derived-class-template via a pointer to base-class-template is UB if the base class-template has a non-virtual dtor.

What if the pointee is deleted by a smart_ptr destructor? I think you can hit this UB.

make dtor pure-virtual 2make class abstract #Google style guide

Many c++ authors say that if you want to make a non-abstract base class abstract, but don’t have any method to “purify” (i.e. convert to pure-virtual), then a standard practice is to purify dtor by adding “=0” at end of the already-virtual dtor.

Note: all base classes should have their dtors virtualized, according to many authorities, but Google style guide says “only if base class has virtual methods”

I wonder why not add a dummy pure-virtual method. (I think in practice this is fine.)

I believe the answer is efficiency, both space-efficiency and possibly run-time efficiency. Adding a dummy pure-virtual adds to every class size and vtbl size, but not instance size. Also every non-abstract sub-class must implement or inherit this dummy method.

is my dtor virtual if I don’t declare it virtual@@ #my take

Q: is my dtor virtual if I don’t declare it virtual?

A lot of implicit rules, but there’s a simple rule — see below

Here’s my long answer
– If you are a top-level class (i.e. not inheriting), and don’t declare a dtor —> non-virtual
+ if you declare it “virtual” —–> virtual
+ if you inherit and declare it “virtual” —–> virtual
= if you inherit but don’t declare a dtor, then synthesized dtor is ——> as virtual as your parent’s
= if you inherit and declare without “virtual”, then your dtor is still —–> as virtual as your parent’s. http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/virtual-functions.html#faq-20.7

Rule — once ancestor’s dtor is declared virtual, descendants have no way of losing the virtuality.

It’s illuminating to visualize the memory layout. Physically, a subclass real estate always encloses a base instance. Since the base real estate has 32 bits for a vptr, every descendant instance has exactly 32 bits for a vptr too, not more no less. Java simply puts the 32 bit footprint into Object.java, so every java object has 1 and only 1 vptr.

If you go through dtor virtuality down a family tree, you may see NV -> NV -> NV …-> V -> V -> V. Once you get a Virtual, you can only get more Virtuals.

As an analogy, a 3-generation warrior is made a king. All his descendants become royal.

As an analogy, a 3-generation farmer becomes a landlord in 1949. All children and grand children are considered by communists as landlords.

Reason? As described in http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/virtual-functions.html#faq-20.4, once a base class gets a (class-level) vtbl, its subclass always gets its own vtbl. I believe every descendant dtor is always on a vtbl.

protected virtual dtor #tricky

[[boost]] P 24 explains the technique of protected virtual destructor. Here’s my take —

The superclass A destructor is called by B’s destructor. See http://www.cplusplus.com/forum/general/12344/. Remember you first clean up the outermost layer of the onion, and remember the B fields exist on the outer layer, outside A’s real estate.

Now, if someone gets hold of an A pointer, where the pointee is B, she can’t call delete on the pointer. Compile time (not run time) error. The special dtor is a protection.

class Base{
  protected: virtual ~Base(){cout <<"base dtor" <<endl;}
};
class Derived : public Base {
  public: virtual ~Derived(){cout <<"derived dtor" <<endl;}
};
int main(){
  Base * p1 = new Derived;
  Derived * p2 = new Derived;
  delete p1; //won't compile
  delete p2; // ok
}

If I swap the 2 words public and protected then I can delete Base ptr but not Derived ptr (compiler error)!

So it seems declared type must have a public dtor. In our examples, even though object is Derived, delete is allowed only on the ptr whose declared type has a public dtor.

Now, What if i have a private dtor? Probably less common, but it’s possible to invoke this private virtual dtor —

class Base{
  public:virtual ~Base(){cout <<"base dtor" <<endl;}
};
class Derived : public Base {
  private: virtual ~Derived(){cout <<"derived dtor" <<endl;}
};
int main(){
  Base * p1 = new Derived;
  delete p1; // ok private destructor called!
}

In my experiments, qq(new) is mandatory as a stackVar or this class will trigger a compiler error, because compiler can’t destroy the object automatically.

virtual — only 1 of the big 3 please

In practice, people seldom virtualize these by mistake, but i feel it’s good to know why.

ctr (incl copier) are never virtual– object is incomplete during construction.

assignment can be (uselessly) marked virtual but won’t work as virtual. Virtual is strict on params. All overrides must specify identical params as the “root” version [1].

There’s always a (default or custom) op= with a param “const HostClass&”, so this func signature is as unique as a fingerprint — Will never match the root version.

Among the big 3, only dtor should be virtual.

[1] both c++ and java. [[annotated ref manual]] explains why.