##specializations fac`same IV quizzes 20Y on#socket !! c++11

(tagline: the most churn-resistant specializations.)

Socket IV questions have remained unchanged for 20Y — Unmatched stability and churn-resistance, but not necessarily accumulating

  • Preservation of t-investment
  • Preservation of accumulation
  • Preservation of deep learning? Socket programming has modest depth.

Q: Beside the specialization of socket programming, are there other specializations that are dominated by the same old QQ questions 20 years on?

  • [S] classic data structures
  • [S] classic sort/search algorithms on int-array, char-array, list ..
  • [S] classic traversal algorithms on trees, general graphs
  • [s] classic recursive, DP, greedy algorithms beyond graphs
  • [S] pre-c++0x core-C++ (a specialization!) questions are largely unchanged. C++11 questions are rooted in the old knowledge base.. BUT most of the c++11 QQ topics will likely fall out of interview fashion
  • [s] cross-language concurrency primitives.
  • unix file/process/string/signal manipulation
  • unix shell scripting — low market value
  • [S] SQL — including join, index design … but seldom quizzed in depth nowadays
  • [S] regex — seldom quizzed, but often needed in coding
  • [S=classic, well-defined specialization]
  • [s=slightly less well-defined specialization]

Now the disqualified skills

  1. JGC + jvm tuning — high churn over 20Y
  2. TMP — new features introduced in c++11
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tech specialization=illusion #cod`IV

My dad is a real specialist. There are new comers who publish books to challenge the established theories, but it always takes a new comer many years of accumulation to make a name.

In contrast, Tech specialization suffers from the combined hazards of 1) churn (+volatility), 2) low entry-barrier,

3) screening interviews are the real watershed just like 高考. The screening used in job interviews are often coding tests. Your specialization is marginally relevant at best. So even if you specialize in, say, cryptocurrency, FunctionalProg, Containers, SOA, .. the hardest interview challenge you face is probably a generic algorithm coding test! Your specialization and accumulation could help you do a better job, but not getting the job. I feel this is like an actress auditioning. You don’t need such strong experience acting; you just need to wow them at audition.

4) market depth — (similar to my dad’s situation) after one job in this specialization, can you easily find another?

most(new/old)specializations turn out non-strategic

Look at my past vindicative specializations vs 

The Singapore government make technology bets. Venture capitalist make bets. Many organizations also make technology bets.. Every technology bet can lose or win.

In this post, I’m not advocating trySomethingNew. I am advocating specialization, which often requires accumulation and sticking to something not so new, like FIX, threading, SQL, sockets, bond math, …

 

## past vindicative specializations

see also — For the “domains nlg” (first 5 rows), marketable_domain_xp spreadsheet is more comprehensive but not necessarily more updated.

Quant and other Unsuccessful diversifications aren’t the focus here, but are listed below the table.

 scales 0-5 mkt value given my direction robust
demand
entry barrier accu achieved %%expertise
among peers@WS
tsn: determination
+sacrifice
I was delighted wage ROI val4IV
mktData #socket  4 growing not everyone has xp  2~3 2 #few worked@socket-level 2  5 some 2
bondMath  2 robust math is not natural
to most dev
 2  3 1 #spare time++  3 some 2
orderBook, OMS, FIX #Eq/FX  3-4 robust medium 1 #cod`IV 1 3 #CVA sacrificed  3 none
forex #sg 2 robust medium 1 1 0 #spare time 1 none
c++  5 ok not
growing
higher than I thought  5 #critical mass  3 5 #huge sacrifice  2 minimal
coding drill  5 Growing high 4 #XR disagrees  3 2 #spare time  5 none 4
python  4~3 growing low  2  3 #unknown 1  4 none
bash scripting + unix #devops  2 robust medium  4  3 0  3 none 1
threading xLang 5 growing high  4 #critical mass  5 0 4 some 5
(abstract?) xLang collection internals 5 unexpected strength the deeper the harder  4 #critical mass  4 0 4 some 5
RDBMS 3 shrinking low  4 #critical mass  4 0 #spare time 1 #under-whelming none
[00-06] web dev 1 sustained high growth low  5 #critical mass  3 0 3 none

–algo practice for IV
^ good amount of accumulation
^ my confidence is boosted esp. in c++
^ I’m rising to the challenge of coding test growing popular

–Python
^ boosts my IV confidence
▼no critical mass yet
▼low traction
▼don’t know my expertise relative to peers

–option domain knowledge including BS:
▼ much lower demand than bond math

— C# and XAML
^ Microsoft is a major force
▼not aligned to my current direction

–MSVS:
^ was my Achilles heel, now slowly gaining confidence

–C++ GTD and IV
^ I made real progress in 1) GTD and 2) IV but not during Mac days — wrong job nature
^ deepens my java understanding
▼ those high paying domains (HFT, quant) are too hard to break into

–MOM architecture, products…
▼falling out of favor
▼ not as widespread as I perceived. Probably used in finance and legacy systems

–javascript, php, mysql
▼not aligned to my direction

–gemfire
▼ market too fragmented

–EJB, Spring, Hibernate
▼falling out of favor

socket^swing: separate(specialized skill)from core lang

  • I always believe swing is a distinct skill from core java. A regular core Java or jxee guy needs a few years experience to become swing veteran.
  • Now I feel socket programming is similarly a distinct skill from core C/c++

In both cases, since the core language knowledge won’t extend to this specialized domain, you need to invest personal time outside work hours .. look at CSY. That’s why we need to be selective which domain.

Socket domain has much better longevity (shelf-life)  than swing!

## threading: a better specialization than algo,quant…

  • In summary — appears daunting and opaque but actually simple in practice
  • theoretical — like [[dougLea]].. my strength. Few coding tests and usually easy for me
  • fairly low-level — my strength. Not as low level as debugger, or template hacks …
  • GTD — no GTD challenges, since most projects use only simple threading designs. The code tracing, trouble-shooting expectation on me is relatively low.
  • opaque — for my peers. Even the basic condVar…
  • churn — low churn at the low level, but high churn at high level
  • ever-green — favorite topic of interviewers, esp. java
  • thin->thick->thin — I have achieved this for a long time.

Many of my halos are in this domain — ##halo across domains #specific=better

##high complexity high mkt-value specializations

Opening example 1: Quartz — High complexity. Zero market value as the deep insight gained is decidedly local and won’t make you a stronger developer on another team.

Opening example 2: IDE, Maven, git, Unix + shell scripting — modest complexity; Makes me stronger developer in real projects, but no premium on the labor market.

My best experiences on Wall St — tech skills with high market value + complexity high enough that few developers could master it. On a project involving these I get better lifestyle, lower stress… Examples:

  • threading
  • java collections
  • SQL complex queries + stored proc. Declining demand in high-end jobs?
  • SQL tuning
  • MOM-based, high volume system implementation — reasonable complexity and market value, but not mainstream. Mostly used in trading only 😦
  • pricing math — high market value but too specialized 😦
  • trading algorithms, price distribution, … Specialized 😦

Let’s look at a few other tech skills:

  • c++ build automation — modest complexity; low value
  • c++ low latency — high value;  barrier too high for me 😦
  • java reflection, serialization — high complexity high practical value, but market value is questionable 😦
  • .NET — some part can be high complexity, but demand is a bit lower than 2011 😦
  • Java tuning — high complexity; not high value practically
  • python — modest complexity, growing market value
  • PHP — lower complexity and lower market value than py, IMHO

tech specialization: no opp2play%%strength ]sg

In the US I can slowly steer my tech specialist career into my chosen strategic domains of specialization like
– threading
– cpp
– financial analytics
– big data
– statistical analysis
– risk analytics

In many of these domains, most of my peers struggle while I am comfortable…. more confidence, more leisure, more free time, less stress ..

In Singapore, I don’t have the luxury because there are Simply too few jobs at my salary level. Those specialized jobs there are, are simply too selective too demanding

— OC: wanted to go deep into drv pricing..

–stirt: wanted to go into curve building and real time risk but ..

–Mac: wanted to go into quant dev …

specialize – to stand out, really@@

In an ever expanding /pool/ of software developers, how do you stand out? Like any technical field (including realtor, dancer, violin-maker and violin-player, photographer…), a proven route is specialization.

Compared to US developers, I feel Singapore young developers generally shun technical specialization. For the Singapore job market, you could specialize in

low-latency
financial math
python, perl, shell scripting,
complex queries and query tuning
threading

See http://bigblog.tanbin.com/2007/07/halo.html

y at this age still !! an expert like Dad@@

At this (or later) age, perhaps Dad was already able to publish valuable information for his research community?

Look at my perl experience.

Look at SGQ. Accummulated dnlg but …
Look at QLN. So many years on SAP cap planning/tuning but perhaps his job scope only gave him routine techniques. Perhaps someone with 1 year training can achieve the same mastery.

Maybe we need to join a cutting-edge dev team in a big co or an open-source team?
Maybe we need to publish.
Maybe we need to present papers in conferences.



skillist^specialize^accu^churn^10yDirection^domainBet

  • Skillist — the leaf-level tech skills. This label is most relevant on old posts without label.
  • 5y_domainBet — helps me choose which industry sector to invest my time and accumulate.
    • Not necessarily a list.
    • 5Y horizon
  • 10y_dir — longer broader view
  • specialize — I’m a specialist type of professional, not a generalist or manager. These posts help me position myself, not necessarily restricting to a particular domain.
  • accu — less specific than “specialize”
  • churn
  • t_skillist and t_feature tags rarely but could be on one post