pick java if you aspire 2be arch #py,c#

If you want to be architect, you need to pick some domains.

Compared to python.. c#.. cpp, Java appears to be the #1 best language overall for most enterprise applications.

  • Python performance limitations seem to require proprietary extensions. I rarely see pure python server that’s heavy-duty.
  • c#is less proven less mature. More importantly it doesn’t work well with the #1 platform — linux.
  • cpp is my 2nd pick. Some concerns:
    • much harder to find talents
    • Fewer open-source packages
    • java is one of the cleanest languages. cpp is a blue-collar language, rough around the edges and far more complex.
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Integer(like String)objects always immutable: java+python #XR

Integer(like String)objects always immutable in java. My google search confirmed that.

Beside serialization, there is no practical reason to deep-copy them.

Python integer objects are also immutable. Every time we modify an int, the new value has a different id(). See also my blog post on python immutable types.

ptr = inevitable when using c-str

It is impossible to use any string without using pointers in C, according to https://stackoverflow.com/questions/1496313/returning-c-string-from-a-function

That’s one reason to call C a lowLevel language.

In most c++ string classes, there’s still a c-string inside every “string object”. I am 99% sure the char-array now lives on heap.

In java and c#, not only the char-array, but the entire string object (including the house-keeping data) live on heap.

c++template^java generics #%%take

A 2017 Wells Fargo interviewer asked me this question. There are many many differences. Here I list my top picks. I feel c# is more like java.

  1. (1st word indicates the category winner)
  2. C++ TMP is quite an advanced art and very powerful. Java generics is useful mostly on collections and doesn’t offer equivalents to most of the TMP techniques.
  3. java List<Student> and List<Trade> shares a single classfile, with uniform implementation of all the methods. In c++ there are distinct object files. Most of the code is duplicated leading to code bloat, but it also supports specialization and other features.
  4. java generics supports extends/super. C# is even “richer”. I think c++ can achieve the same with some of the TMP tricks
  5. c++ supports template specialization
  6. C++ wins — java doesn’t allow primitive type arguments and requires inefficient boxing. C# improved on it. This is more serious than it looks because most c++ templates use primitive type arguments.
  7. c++ supports non-dummy-type template param, so you can put in a literal argument of “1.3”
  8. c++ actual type argument is available at runtime. Java erases it, but I can’t give a concrete example illustrating the effect.

 

GTD skill is harder,lasts longer in c++ than in Cleaner languages

In terms of troubleshooting, C++ is 90% same as C, which is a low-level language, close to the hardware.

In contrast, higher level languages strive to have the low level details encapsulated, so developers only need to deal with a simplified, standardized, cleaner façade. Some call it a virtualization.

Eg: sockets

Eg: c++ threading vs java threading

declare variables ] loop header: j^C #for

Small trick to show off in your coding test…

Background — In short code snippet, I want to minimize variable declarations. The loop control variable declaration is something I always want to avoid.

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/38766891/is-it-possible-to-declare-a-variable-within-a-java-while-conditional shows java WHILE-loop header allows assignment:

List<Object> processables;
while ((processables = retrieveProcessableItems(..)).size() > 0) {/*/}

But only (I’m 99% sure) c++ WHILe-loop header allows variable declaration.

The solution — both java/c++ FOR-loop headers allow variable declarations. Note the condition is checked Before first iteration, in both for/while loops.

c# static classes : java/c++

–c++:

use a (possibly nested) namespace to group related free functions. See google style guide.

–java:

Java 8 allows static methods in interfaces. See https://stackoverflow.com/questions/512877/why-cant-i-define-a-static-method-in-a-java-interface

–c# is the most avant-garde on this front

  • C# static class can be stateful but rarely are
  • it can have a private ctor