##some@the significant coding IV experiences

Sugg: practice with additional (real!) cpp coding IV. No pain no gain. No shortcuts.

“webex” is shorthand for any form of remote screen sharing tool

Lang onsite? IDE? firm P/F
J onsite paper BGC P 2017
J home IDE BGC -connected P 2017
J home IDE HSBC P 2017
J home IDE pimco – iterator P 2017
J onsite paper pimco -Zoltan P 2017
c webex paper Citadel 😦 2017 ez question
py webex paper Broadway -hashtable P 2017
J home codility Baml – FX options 😦 2015 too lazy
c home codility Jump 3rd 😦 2015
c home IDE jump – order book P 2012
c home IDE Tetris 😦 2015 coding style poor
c webex paper bbg -London 😦 2015 unable to understand the Q
c onsite paper bbg -2nd time 😦 2011
c# webex paper Reuters – eikon P 2013
swing webex IDE Barclays – Barx P 2012
j onsite IDE RBC – Korean mgr p 2010

##%%offers 2017

$c2c co where primary tech other tech domain nlg duration
100 pimco NPB[1] c++11 🙂 🙂 🙂 java, possibly Hadoop 🙂 FI accrual math 🙂 3+
100 pimco NYC java framework 🙂 🙂 flexible
100+ bgc NYC java minimal cpp FX.. trading to perm 😦 😦 😦
below 100 😦 😦 Ravi Chgo 😦 😦 Qz 😦 😦 😦 java FI trading again flexible

[1] A bit hard to get next job in NY, but helps me get a next job in West Coast. However, in terms of buying a home, I just don’t know.

IV^CV is real battle

(Adapted from a Mar 2017 letter to Lisa Wang… )Let me share my observations and reflections on this tough job hunt. Another stock-taking. Focus here is non-finance jobs in the U.S.

For months I used a slightly tweaked CV for non-banking (“main street”) tech positions, but it’s not working — Out of the 30 to 40 non-finance positions I applied, precious few (15%??) recruiters were interested. Suppose 5 recruiters showed interest, I guess not all of them submitted my resume. Suppose 4 did submit. So far, no hiring manager was impressed with my non-finance CV. (Response from financial firms are better but not my focus today.)

So different from my prime time (from 2010 to 2012) when my finance-oriented resume was selling like a hot cake. I would estimate more than 50% of the recruiters were impressed and many hiring managers showed interest.

Of course, I’m comparing my “main street” resume against my Wall-St resume. Not a fair comparison but it does highlight these key issues:

Recruiter engagement is the #1 issue and hiring manager engagement is #2 issue. Interview competence is a distant #3 and not a key issue. Many people disagree — “you need no more than one successful interview.” They believe a 50-80% interview success rate is the silver bullet needed. Well, how long must you wait before you fire your silver bullet?

I feel much better if my interview pass rate is only 20% (or 10%), but I get 5 times more interviews! I learned from experience that my interview performance improvement is limited without sufficient interviews. So it’s far more effective and strategic to work on getting more interviews. I don’t want to be one of those guys who need 6 months to find a job. I see them starved of oxygen. Steady flow of interviews keep me motivated and focused, too.

In conclusion the key issue is crafting a compelling resume to engage recruiters and hiring managers. (A more pressing issue on main-street front than on the Wall-st front.)

Therefore, I count each interview scheduled as a success. In contrast, an offer is less significant an achievement. Analogies:
* as a singer, each TV appearance is a success; Winning a singing contest is less significant.
* as a growing basketballer, each time I get to play on court is a success; winning a game is less significant.

I have always told my peers that 90% of the job candidate competition is on the resume, and 10% on interviews. (Now I feel 95%/5%) Many candidates can pass interviews if given the chance. The chance is given to winning resumes. I say this to my friends because I learned from experience to invest much more effort improving the resume, until it can impress a large percentage of recruiters and hiring managers.

For the “main street” positions, I hope to engage 33% of the recruiters and 10% of the hiring managers. With that, if I were to try 30 opportunities, I could expect to get 3 interviews!

2017 hunt priorities

To optimize for income, I would leverage on my 1) analytics 2) threading 3) SQL (+ possibly algo) expertise. Importance of income:

  • health insurance — will need for kids for sure
  • first few gigs might be low rate, given the dry season
  • home purchase in 5Y — confirmed requirement. If I want short commute + Chinese community, then price will be high
  • might go without income longer, like a few months
  • initial set-up cost — 5k-10k, but at this level adjustment on wife’s part will be tough. Even a 20k relief fund is drop in a bucket. Need 100k.
  • tail risk — I might come back to SGP sooner (like end of 2017) and take a low-pay job
  • tail risk — if GC process goes astray, I may go back to SG without a GC, so the X years I spent here I need to earn enough.

May not have much of a choice, given the slow c2c market right now.

My 2017 priorities:

  1. avoid churn? so avoid web, javascript, in-memory DB, spring/hibernate and most of the new technologies I hear about the west coast
  2. muscle-building contexx? so avoid java/sql? Better to deepen my c++ as a 2nd front. Willing to take lower salary? LG2 can postpone this to 2018/2019. See post on re-enter c++
  3. my c++ learning is reaching a critical mass
  4. —- unsorted lower priorities —-
  5. income to keep me feeling secure and self-respecting. I got this from the offers!
  6. flexibility to work from Singapore. Can spend more time with wife, parents and kids.
  7. location for upcoming home-purchase
  8. unlock new markets — west coast, c++, data science ..
  9. commute?
  10. chance to impress manager
  11. leisure time to exercise, improve c++, call home, learn driving etc

My ideal (yet realistic) 1st project:

  • slightly below (like 80%) my capacity. Chance to impress manager due to my specialty knowledge. “These managers could make things happen”.
  • has spare capacity to check out the potential homes
  • salary? LG2 like $65/hr
  • c++ or java
  • possibly west coast but the high rate is usually for FTE.

Alternatively, a temp contract to try c++ again, but only after I clear some high-end java interviews to build my confidence in earning capacity.

  • low salary like 120k
  • hands-on c++ (not C) on a large codebase to build mileage
  • NY or west coast or anywhere else

describing “latest” project

Avoid naive honesty, which often backfires. Such honesty doesn’t serve any purpose. We are professionals, expected to communicate truthfully but also stay relevant. The major challenge or a key component I created may be irrelevant to the interviewer or impossible to describe over phone.

Q: which component did you *design* ?

%%A: wait/notify framework to associate order requests sent out with response received. See the SCB concurrency design question

Q: major contribution?

%%A: Preferences framework
%%A: wait/notify framework

Q: major challenges?

%%A: I will describe the cancelled trade blotter
%%A: wait/notify framework

Q: what does the system do, in layman’s term