c++^java..how relevant ] 20Y@@

See [17] j^c++^c# churn/stability…

C++ has survived more than one wave of technology churn. It has lost market share time and time again, but hasn’t /bowed out/. I feel SQL, Unix and shell-scripting are similar survivors.

C++ is by far the most difficult languages to use and learn. (You can learn it in 6 months but likely very superficial.) Yet many companies still pick it instead of java, python, ruby — sign of strength.

C is low-level. C++ usage can be equally low-level, but c++ is more complicated than C.

Advertisements

[18]top 4 IV(!! GTD)domains 2 provide 20Y job security

See also

Let’s ignore zbs or GTD or biz domains like mktData/risk here …

  • –roughly ranked by value-to-me
  • [c s] java? resilient in the face of c# and dynamic languages. At least 10Y relevance.
  • [c s] c++? resilient in the face of java. Time-honored like SQL
  • [c] abstract algorithm and data structures, comp science problem solving
  • [c n] tcp/udp optimization + other hardware/kernel/compiler optimizations
  • ……….No more [c]
  • py + shell scripting? no [c] rating since depth unappreciated
  • Linux and windows? at least 10Y growth, but no [c]
  • [s] SQL? resilient in the face of noSQL, but no [c]
  • bond math?
  • [n s] FIX? At least 10Y relevance
  • [c=high complexity in IV; shelf-life; depth appreciated …]
  • [n=niche, but resilient]
  • [s=survived serious challenges]

##teaching the privileged to get ahead@@

It’s often easier, more lucrative to focus on the affluent consumers, but consider “value”.

Example — trading techniques. This kinda teaching doesn’t really have much social value, except .. risk reduction? Zero-sum game … you help some win, so other investors must lose.

Example — coach some brainy kids get into gifted classes. This is gaming the competitive “system”. Actually the poor kids need your help more.

Example — coach table tennis kids win competitions. Arguably you help improve the table tennis game, but how much social value is there? Mostly you are helping those few individual kids get-ahead

Many other teaching subjects do have social value

  • languages, writing
  • tech, math, science
  • programming
  • health care
  • financial literacy
  • arts

EarlyRetireExtreme: learning as pastime !! mainstay

The ERE author enjoys learning practical skills as a hobby. In fact, his learning programs could be more than a hobby, since he has no full time job.

However, I am very different human being from him. I feel very few such learning programs can the mainstay during my semi- or full retirement. Why?

  • I need to work towards some level of commitment, and a daily routine.
  • I need to make some contribution and be paid for it
  • I prefer interaction with other people

af 70,non-profit OK; voluntary work no

After my prime years, when I can only work half the time, I may be able to work towards some meaningful cause, but not completely voluntary work. If there’s no income, I will have low motivation to continue.

With a salary, I feel more commitment, more responsibility.

In our later years, my wife and I also have a non-trivial financial need. I don’t want to depend on my kids or welfare to support ourselves. I may have to continue my drive for more income.

##af 70 ..spend%%spare time meaningfully

Holy grail — Long-term sustainable (hopefully intrinsic) motivation + modest level of expertise, with reliable (albeit low) income and (a bit of) social value.

I need a purpose, a goal to work towards… Without it, the absence of a … job would create a void. Depression, lack of purpose, loss of energy. None of the below is easily achievable or easily available. Whichever I choose, need to work towards it.

  • I have proven aptitude in theoretical domains ..
  • Teach Chinese/English, with emphasis on writing and vocab
  • Two-way translation service, but I prefer interactions.
  • Teach programming — threading, data struct, algo
  • If not outdated, Teach statistical data analysis?
  • If not outdated, Teach enterprise app design? Too competitive. They may not take in an old programmer.
  • Teach financial math? After 70?
    • ▼this domain is too competitive and entry barrier too high. A lot of effort to cross it but demand is low.
    • ▼Limited practical value. more specialized, but growing demand.
    • ▼I feel I need interaction with people.
  • Chinese medicine?
  • help my children take care of their families

Tim (ICE), a friend in his 50’s gave 3 points

  • earn a salary to help kids pay student loan
  • travel — costs a lot
  • volunteering

prepare]advance for RnD career

Grandpa became too old to work full time. Similarly, at age 75 I may not be able to work 8 hours a day. Some job functions are more suitable for that age…

I guess there’s a spectrum of “insight accumulation” — from app developer to tuning, to data science/analysis to academic research and teaching. The older I get (consider age 70), the more I should consider a move towards the research end of the spectrum…

My master’s degree from a reputable university is a distinct advantage. Without it, this career choice would be less viable. (Perhaps more importantly) It also helps that my degree is in a “hard” subject. A PhD may not give me more choices.

For virtually all of these domains, U.S. has advantages over Singapore. Less “difficult/unlikely” in U.S.

In theory I could choose an in-demand research domain within comp science, math, investment and asset pricing … a topic I believe in, but in reality entry barrier could be too high, and market depth poor

Perhaps my MSFM and c++ investment don’t bear fruit for many years, but become instrumental when I execute a bold career switch.