depth: %%tech strength@@

Some top geeks I know are fast at reading code + logs. Few rely on documentation. I’m OK not the fastest.

Some top geeks in “sister” teams of my team are experts with instrumentation tools and techniques. I guess other top geeks seldom need a lot of instrumentation. I feel they lack the experience but make up for it in other skills.

Some top geeks keep gaining depth if they focus on one complex system. I might have potential here.

a profession u enjoy, with decent {income+barrier}

Background — discussion with an older fellow developer about helping our high-school kids select a major.

Example — Look at Aunt Gennifer. She changed her profession around age 40 to find a less boring job, and paying more.

Example — grandpa has an ever-green interest in his research field, but most researchers in this field are not well-paid (it’s the least commercial field of research). In terms of income, I think grandpa’s medical and pension benefits are in the the top 1%.

Example — me. I entered trading-engine-dev circa 2007.

  • It pays well above the average professional salary across all professions. (I was told U.S. family doctors earn about 150k only.)
  • Market depth is excellent — look at my post on NBA salary.
  • The constant pressure to upgrade and learn is perfectly acceptable to me. In fact, I seek opportunities to maintain my learning pace
  • I don’t find it tiring or boring. For a few years before 2007, I told myself “I don’t want to remain a developer for life” but had a U-turn.

For most people, it’s hard to find a profession that’s not boring, not too tiring, and pays well, a field you could keep plowing till retirement, if you ever retire.

In fact, such a field is likely to be /oversubscribed/ — too many hopeful new entrants but few would get in and fewer would survive 😦

A large number of individuals have a meaningful and rewarding “hobby” but can’t make a decent income from it

  • tweaking with computers and gadgets
  • visual arts # including photography
  • literary arts
  • performing arts #including music
  • sports, games #including board and electronic
  • cooking

skill: deepen^diversify^stack up

Since 2010, I have carefully evaluated and executed 3 broad strategies:

  1. deepen – for zbs + IV
  2. diversify or branch-out. Breaking into new markets
  3. stack-up – cautiously
  • eg: Deepened my java/SQL/c++/py knowledge for IV and GTD. See post on QQ vs ZZ.
  • eg: diversified to c++, c#, quant, swing…
  • eg: diversify? west coast.
  • eg: diversify? data science
  • eg: diversify? research + teach
  • eg: stack-up to learn spring, hibernate, noSQL, GWT.

Stack-up — These skills are unlikely to unlock new markets. Lower leverage.

GTD stress/survival on the job? None of these help directly, but based on my observation GTD skill seldom advance my career as a contractor. It could create a bit of spare time, but it’s a challenge to make use of the spare time.

I feel German’s strategy goes beyond tech skills. He treats tech skills as a tool, used to implement his business ideas to create business value. I feel his target role is a mix of architect/BA but more like “product visionary”. It’s somewhat like stack-up.

##2017cod`IV%%tech strengths

Look at my HSBC eventBus coding interview. This is one of my top 3 core competences that make me stand out in a crowded field. Other items among top 10:

  • 9/10 java knowledge including
    1. threading
    2. collections
  • 9/10 algorithm interview
  • 8/10 SQL — less relevant to interviews
    1. complex joins
    2. table design
  • 5/10 professional competence in c++ and c#
  • 5/10 python, 8/10 perl
  • 6/10 Unix power tools

(x/10 is benchmarking on Wall St, not West Coast.)

spare time utilization: %%strength

Very few peers are so conscious of burn^rot. Higher utilization of spare time is a key strength during my US peak + my dotcom peak + also my high school. We could analyze what’s common and what’s different between these peaks…

Outside those peaks, I also used this strength to complete my UChicago program, but the tangible benefit is smaller.

(This is different from efficiency on the job. Many efficient colleagues spend less time in office but get more done.  My style involves sacrificing personal spare time and family time.)

Looking forward, I guess this strength could be strategic for research-related domains, including any job involving some elements of research and accumulation.

A repeated manager praise for me is “broad-based”, related to this strength.

tech strength^weak, as@Nov2016

My strengths – quick but more than superficial learning of (in random order):

  • finmath, financial jargon,
  • Comp Science practical topics:
    • OO fundamentals
    • algo, data structures,
    • threading
    • basic tuning of DB + others
  • language fundamentals (more respected in the java, c++, c#, SQL than python communities)
    • versatile in many important languages
  • relative familiarity with scripting, unix, SQL, but not IDE, version control etc
  • relatively quick whiteboard (not compiler) coding

This strength turned out to be extremely valuable on Wall St consulting market.

My key weakness identified in recent jobs (not counting the IV defeats):

  • learning local system
  • large existing codebase – AutoReo, GS
  • superfast GTD

theoretical complexity: %%strength

Some peers (such as Lu) are good at climbing the corporate ladder. Someone must play the leadership roles in those MNC Asia offices, so if Lu has a strong track record he would get it. In Asia, I feel left behind on the slow track – painful, disappointing. In the US, immigrant techies are less likely to climb up (except some Indians). I often feel an inner competitive strength due to those competences that my peers are usually lacking, such as
– Threading,
– algos and data structures
– SQL hacks
– Perl/linux hacks
– math
– (non-trivial) jargon

These are among my top 3 competitive strengths. My sweet spot domains are typically

  • Complex
  • theoretically, and academically demanding, at least for the uninitiated
  • entry barrier
  • High value and high impact on the project
  • portable, unlike Quartz knowhow

In the US I have such opportunities, though nothing guaranteed.