U.S.hiring managers may avoid bright young candidates

My colleague Alan pointed out that some hiring managers are cautious with young bright candidates.

Some companies have a policy to promote younger employee. In terms of competitive threat, the older candidates are perceived as "disarmed" weapons.

Some hiring managers may also want to protect his old loyal employees, who may be put under threat by a young bright newcomer.

big bright world behind that thick heavy door

(Was so hard to get over U.S. barriers in the form of h1b and later GC …)

Was so hard to overcome the English barrier … I struggled so very hard. Slowly I was able to express myself, with a big enough vocab…. Once the door crack opens, I got my first glimpse of a big, bright world[1] behind the door. Immediately I could see myself thriving in that world.

With a safe retreat always available, there’s no real risk [2] to me so I boldly jumped in as soon as possible.

So which items in the 5advantages post? Job pool !

[1] Some people don’t need English and can do well using Chinese as primary language … I’m different.
[2] there’s indeed some risk to wife and to kids…

5 thrusts/directions over next5Y in U.S.

1) buy 1st home as soon as financially feasible. Before that consider REITs.

2) shift more focus to academic parenting

3) start PhD if everything works out. Will pave the way to a research/teaching career till age 75

4) consider some Chinese-language-teaching business for wife

5) may need to change gear to a relaxed job, but maintain competitiveness on job market (I didn’t say “on the job”)

I feel my health and job market competitiveness (#5) are the foundation.

pyramid of wage levels, CN^SG^US

See also the similar post on NBA salary

Look at my brother-in-law. (I’m not too sure about his situation so I will use tentative statements.) He’s smart, dedicated. Rather long experience as a team lead. He has a masters from a top uni in Shanghai.

However, there are many people with similarly strong track record in China, so he can’t move up the pyramid to, say CNY 1000k. I guess 500k is also tough.

In Singapore I’m facing a similar challenge. A S$150k (after tax) tech job is rare and considered elite so you need to be rather strong to get it. In other words, the pyramid has a sharper tip than in the US pyramid, based on a sample of 5,000 IT jobs.

(I think the Shanghai salary distro is better than most China cities…)

The NBA post brings together other important factors — lifelong income; managerial skill; …

stable job4H1 guys#le2HenryWu

Hi Henry,

See if you can connect me to your H1 sponsor at your earliest convenience.

For most H1 immigrants, having a stable job is a top priority. We all worry about losing our job, losing the H1 status and Green card petition.

Therefore, many prefer a big, reputable employer. Some prefer a consulting firm that can help maintain our H1 status even when we change project from time to time. There are definitely risks of “gaps” between 2 jobs. In my experience, 1 to 3 months are tolerable. Beyond that, there are probably other solutions. It all depends on the last employer and the lawyer. Remember I’m not an immigration attorney.

In the Worst scenario the employer cancels the H1 right away. The USCIS regulation probably allows us (“the aliens”) to stay in the US for a few weeks looking for the next job. If we can’t find any, we should ask our lawyer when we have to leave the country. We would re-enter once we find a new employer.

The exit/reentry can (in my imagination) be a real hassle for someone with a big family, esp. if kids are in school. It might be best to avoid the exit/reentry. I guess this is one reason many H1 families are fearful of layoff and prefer a stable job even at a lower salary. (Overall, Singapore companies are less likely to layoff large number of staff.)

Therefore, if I were you I would prefer a stable job. As a risk taker, I will take a gamble that I could reduce the “gap” between jobs to 2 months, by being flexible on the salary.

social class]U.S. n%%chosen tech domain

I used to feel US is a less class-conscious society than China or Singapore. Anyone can make it in this “free”, meritocratic country. Then “insiders” tell me about the old boy’s circle, and the alumni circles on Wall St.

I feel in any unequal, hierarchical society, there are invisible walls between social strata. I was lucky to be an immigrant in technology. If I step out of tech into management, I am likely to face class, racial bias/affinity and … I would no longer be “in-demand” as in tech. Look at the number of Chinese managers in GS. Many make VP but few rise further.

Therefore the tech role is a sweet spot for an immigrant techie like me. Beside Tech, a few professions are perhaps less hierarchical – trading, medical, academic, research(?), teaching …