retrans questions from IV+ from me

Q11 (2 x IV): do you track gaps for Line A and also track gaps in Line B?
A: No, according to Deepak and Shanyou. Deepak said we treat the seq from Line A/B as one combined sequence (with duplicates) and track gaps therein

Q2 (IV x 2): Taking parser + orderbook (i.e. rebus) as a single black box, when you notice a gap (say seq #55/56/57), do you continue to process seq # 58, 59 … or do you warehouse these #58, 59… messages and wait until you get the resent #55/56/57 messages?
A: no warehousing. We process #58 right away.

Q2b (IV): In your orderbook engine (like Rebus), suppose you get a bunch of order delete/exec/modify messages, but the orderId is unrecognized and possibly pending retrans. Rebus doesn’t know about any pending retrans. What would rebus do about those messages?
%%A: I don’t know the actual design [3], but if I were the architect I would always check the orderId. If orderId is unknown then I warehouse the message. If it is a known order Id in Rebus, I will apply the message on the order book. Risks? I can’t think of any.

[3] It’s important to avoid stating false facts, so i will add the disclaimer.

Q2c (IV): what data structures would you use to warehouse those pending messages? ( I guess this question implies warehousing is needed.)
%%A: a linked list would do. Duplicate seqNum check is taken care of by parser.

Q13 (IV): do you immediately send a retrans request every time you see a gap like (1-54, then 58,59…)? Or do you wait a while?
A: I think we do need to wait since UDP can deliver #55 out of sequence. Note Line A+B are tracked as a combined stream.

Q13b: But how long do we wait?
A: 5 ms according to Deepak

Q13c: how do you keep a timer for every gap identified?
%%A: I think we could attach a timestamp to each gap.

— The above questions were probably the most important questions in a non-tech interview. In other words, if an interview has no coding no QQ then most of the questions would be simpler than these retrans questions ! These questions test your in-depth understanding of a standard mkt data feed parser design. 3rd type of domain knowledge.

Q: after you detect a gap, what does your parser do?
A (Deepak): parser saves the gap and moves on. After a configured timeout, parser sends out the retrans request. Parser monitors messages on both Line A and B.

Q: if you go on without halting the parser, then how would the rebus cope?

  • A: if we are missing the addOrder, then rebus could warehouse all subsequent messages about unknown order IDs. Ditto for a Level 1 trade msg.

Deepak felt this warehouse could build up quickly since the ever-increasing permanent gaps could contain tens of thousands of missing sequence numbers. I feel orderId values are increasing and never reused within a day, so we can check if an “unknown” orderId is very low and immediately discard it, assuming the addOrder is permanently lost in a permanent gap.

  • A: if we are missing an order cancel (or trade cancel), i.e. the last event in the life cycle, then we don’t need to do anything special. When the Out-of-sequence message shows up, we just apply it to our internal state and send it to downstream with the OOS flag.

If a order cancel is lost permanently, we could get a crossed order book. After a few refreshes (15min interval), system would discard stale orders sitting atop a crossed book.

In general, crossed book can be fixed via the snapshot feed. If not available in integrated feed, then available in the open-book feed.

  • A: If we are missing some intermediate msg like a partial fill, then we won’t notice it. I think we just proceed. The impact is smaller than in FIX.

OOS messages are often processed at the next refresh time.

Q3b: But how long do we wait before requesting retrans?
Q3c: how do you keep a timer for every gap identified?

Q14: after you send a retrans request but gets no data back, how soon do you resend the same request again?
A: a few mills, according to Deepak. I think

Q14b: Do you maintain a timer for every gap?
%%A: I think my timestamp idea will help.

Q: You said the retrans processing in your parser shares the same thread as regular (main publisher) message processing. What if the publisher stream is very busy so the gaps are neglected? In other words, the thread is overloaded by the publisher stream.
%%A: We accept this risk. I think this seldom happens. The exchange uses sharding to ensure each stream is never overloaded.

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