edit1file]big python^c++ prod system #XR

Q1: suppose you work in a big, complex system with 1000 source files, all in python, and you know a change to a single file will only affect one module, not a core module. You have tested it + ran a 60-minute automated unit test suit. You didn’t run a prolonged integration test that’s part of the department-level full release. Would you and approving managers have the confidence to release this single python file?
A: yes

Q2: change “python” to c++ (or java or c#). You already followed the routine to build your change into a dynamic library, tested it thoroughly and ran unit test suite but not full integration test. Do you feel safe to release this library?
A: no.

Assumption: the automated tests were reasonably well written. I never worked in a team with a measured test coverage. I would guess 50% is too high and often impractical. Even with high measured test coverage, the risk of bug is roughly the same. I never believe higher unit test coverage is a vaccination. Diminishing return. Low marginal benefit.

Why the difference between Q1 and Q2?

One reason — the source file is compiled into a library (or a jar), along with many other source files. This library is now a big component of the system, rather than one of 1000 python files. The managers will see a library change in c++ (or java) vs a single-file change in python.

Q3: what if the change is to a single shell script, used for start/stop the system?
A: yes. Manager can see the impact is small and isolated. The unit of release is clearly a single file, not a library.

Q4: what if the change is to a stored proc? You have tested it and run full unit test suit but not a full integration test. Will you release this single stored proc?
A: yes. One reason is transparency of the change. Managers can understand this is an isolated change, rather than a library change as in the c++ case.

How do managers (and anyone except yourself) actually visualize the amount of code change?

  • With python, it’s a single file so they can use “diff”.
  • With stored proc, it’s a single proc. In the source control, they can diff this single proc
  • with c++ or java, the unit of release is a library. What if in this new build, beside your change there’s some other change , included by accident? You can’t diff a binary 😦

So I feel transparency is the first reason. Transparency of the change gives everyone (not just yourself) confidence about the size/scope of this change.

Second reason is isolation. I feel a compiled language (esp. c++) is more “fragile” and the binary modules more “coupled” and inter-dependent. When you change one source file and release it in a new library build, it could lead to subtle, intermittent concurrency issues or memory leaks in another module, outside your library. Even if you as the author sees evidence that this won’t happen, other people have seen innocent one-line changes giving rise to bugs, so they have reason to worry.

  • All 1000 files (in compiled form) runs in one process for a c++ or java system.
  • A stored proc change could affect DB performance, but it’s easy to verify. A stored proc won’t introduce subtle problems in an unrelated module.
  • A top-level python script runs in its own process. A python module runs in the host process of the top-level script, but a typical top-level script will include just a few custom modules, not 1000 modules. Much better isolation at run time.

There might be python systems where the main script actually runs in a process with hundreds of custom modules (not counting the standard library modules). I have not seen it.

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