python: routine^complex tasks

XR,

Further to our discussion, I used perl for many years. 95% of my perl tasks are routine tasks. With py, I would say “majority” of my tasks are routine tasks i.e. solutions are easy to find on-line.

  • routine tasks include automated testing, shell-script replacement, small-scale code generation, text file processing, query XML, various data stores or via http post/get
  • For “Complex tasks” , at least some part of it is tricky and not easily solved by Googling. Routine reflection / concurrency / c++Integration / daemon process… are documented widely, with sample code, but these techniques can be pushed to the limit.
    •  Even if we just use these techniques as well-documented, but we combine them in unusual ways, then Google search will not be enough.
    • Beware — decorators , meta-programming, polymorphism, on-the-fly code-generation, serialization, remote procedure call … all rely on reflection.

When you say py is not as easy as xxx and takes several years to learn, I think you referred to complex tasks.

I can see a few reasons why managers choose py over java for certain tasks. I heard there are a few jvm-based scripting languages (scala, groovy, clojure, jython …) but I guess python beats them on several fronts including more packages (i.e. wheels) and more mature, more complete and proven solutions, familiarity, reliability + wider user base.

One common argument to prefer any scripting language over any compiled language is faster development. True for routine tasks. For complex tasks, “your mileage may vary”. As I said, if the software system requirement is inherently complex, then implementation in any language will be complex. When the task is complex, I actually prefer more verbose source code — possibly more transparent and less “opaque”.

Quartz is one example of a big opaque system for a complex task. If you want, I can describe some of the complex tasks (in py) I have come across though I don’t have the level of insight that some colleagues have.

When you said the python debugger was less useful to you than java debugger, it’s a sign of java’s transparency. My “favorite” opaque parts of py are module import and reflection.

If python (or any language) has excellent performance/stability + good on-line resources [1] + reasonable library of components comparable to the mature languages like Java/c++, then I feel sooner or later it will catch on. I feel python doesn’t have exactly the performance.

[1] documentation is nice-to-have but not sufficient. Many programmers don’t have time to read documentation in-depth.

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