tibrv-UDP-multicast vs tcp-hub/spoke-JMS

http://narencoolgeek.blogspot.com/2006/01/tibco-rv-vs-tibco-ems.html
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/580858/tibco-rendezvous-and-msmq

Looks like the consensus is
* tibco rv — fastest, high volume, high throughput, less-then-perfect reliability even with certified delivery
* JMS — slower but perfect reliability.

Before adding bells and whistles, core RV was designed for
* efficient delivery — no bandwidth waste
* high volume, high throughput
* multicast, not hub/spoke, not p2p
* imperfect reliability. CM is on top of core RV
* no distributed transaction, whereas JMS standard requires XA. I struggled with a Weblogic jms xa issue in 2006

— simple scenario —

If a new IBM quote has to reach 100 subscribers, JMS (hub/spoke unicast topic) uses tcp/ip to send it 100 times, sequentially [3]. Each subscriber has a unique IP address and accepts this 1 message, and ignores the other 99. In contrast, Multicast sends [4] it once, and only duplicates/clones a message when the links to the destinations split [5]. RV uses a proprietary protocol over UDP.

[5] see my blogpost https://wordpress.com/post/bintanvictor.wordpress.com/32651

[3] http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~priya/WFoMT2002/Pang-Maheshwari.pdf benchmark tests reveals “The SonicMQ broker requires a separate TCP connection to each of the subscriber. Hence the more subscribers there are, the longer it takes for SonicMQ to deliver the same amount of messages.
[4] Same benchmark shows the sender is the RVD daemon. It simply broadcasts to the entire network. Whoever interested in the subject will get it.

— P233 [[weblogic definitive guide]] suggests
* multicast jms broker has a constant workload regardless how many subscribers. This is because the broker sends it once rather than 100 times as in our example.
* multicast saves network bandwidth. Unicast topic requires 100 envelopes processed by the switches and routers.

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